Guide Prototype - by CHCLT Design

Innovative communication in the healthcare sector

Innovative communication in the South African healthcare sector

Guide Prototype - by CHCLT Design
Guide Prototype - by CHCLT Design

We are excited to be part of the development of an innovative tool that supports healthcare workers. The tool assists in monitoring the growth of infants and toddlers. These tools aim to improve how growth data is captured and interpreted but, more importantly, enhance the way in which healthcare workers engage with caregivers through constructive dialogue.

Innovative Slide + Guide Workshop
Open CPT x CHCLT - Slide + Guide Workshop (April 2018)

Establishing meaningful conversations enables healthcare workers to establish rapport and learn more about the child and caregiver’s context, allowing for preventative intervention to take place when necessary. This fits into the broader movement in South Africa around empowering caregivers as the central figure to their child’s wellbeing.

Innovative Slide + Guide Workshop - April 2018
Slide + Guide Workshop - April 2018

Plotting growth trends correctly and conveying supportive, constructive messages to caregivers is an essential task for healthcare workers. It is also key to ensuring the healthy development of infants and toddlers. The tool is designed to be tactile, flexible and easy-to-use by health-care workers when plotting key measurements such as the baby’s weight and height on a chart during a consultation, and comparing these changes over time.

 

Innovative Slide + Guide Workshop - April 2018
Slide + Guide Workshop - April 2018

We will help revise and pilot the tool with health-care workers across greater Cape Town. This is to create the best possible tool, with the highest possible impact. The inception of the tool came about as a means to accompany the Road to Health Booklet. Pending a nationwide roll-out, it has the potential to reach every newborn child in South Africa. The tool is the brainchild of Innovation Edge and the Slide + Guide has been designed by CHCLT.

 

About Open CPT

The future of employee communication is design-driven, experiential, digital and engaging. ​We help organisations navigate the landscape.​​ We innovate; we rethink; we co-create. We inspire ; we act; we share. ​​And we build on a decade of experience working with some of Europe’s largest and most successful corporations. ​

Open CPT is an internal communication agency based in Cape Town, South Africa. ​​ We develop innovative ways of communicating with employees, leaders and stakeholders to drive engagement and create sustainable change. ​​

Open CPT is a subsidiary of leading European employee communication agency, Open, and rooted in Open’s principles of creativity, involvement and simplicity. ​​Drawing on a decade of experience from working with some of Europe’s largest corporations, we offer fresh as well as tried-and-tested approaches.


Dialogue Matters - Breakfast Sessions

 

Do you want to know about the latest topics in employee communications and connect with other communicators? 

The Dialogue Matters breakfast sessions are run 2 – 4 times a year between Cape Town and Johannesburg. These sessions offer insights, case studies and networking around the latest topics on the agenda in the field of corporate communications and reputation management. 

Dialogue Matters session, Johannesburg 2018
Dialogue Matters session, Johannesburg 2018

 

We run these sessions as a collaboration between Open Cape Town Reputation Matters, and Lisa Wannell (Specialist Search Consultant)

 

Dialogue Matters session, Johannesburg 2018
Dialogue Matters session, Johannesburg 2018

To get invitations and information about our sessions, please subscribe to our newsletter. 


On the Mic: Lene Mi Ran Kristiansen

On the Mic: Lene Mi Ran Kristiansen from LM Wind Power

We're so glad to have Lene Mi Ran Kristiansen, Senior Manager, Communications & Sustainability at LM Wind Power, sharing what she sees as key when communicating sustainability and carbon neutrality.

By: Betina Sørensen, Senior Creative Advisor (March 4, 2018)

 

What’s on the top of your employee communication agenda right now?
Strategy execution, GE integration, and sustainability with our carbon neutrality program #CleanLM at the very top!

What was your latest success and what made it a success?
Recently, we did an interactive workshop session for the top 130 global leaders of the company, challenging them to play a huge cardboard game: Go Carbon Neutral in 30 mins.

It was their first in-depth experience with our ambitious sustainability program and it worked brilliantly because the format and game design dynamics compelled our leaders to learn about the concept and methods to go carbon neutral. To be able to finish the game they had to collaborate, negotiate, and agree. It made them reflect on the challenge and daunting task we as a business have taken upon us by setting this ambitious goal.

It was a very effective way of creating awareness and ambassadors who now are able to articulate what we are doing to their teams and other stakeholders, helping to foster further interest, support, and hopefully inspiration so more colleagues get engaged.

Why is it important to communicate your carbon neutrality pledge internally?
Many LM Wind Power employees have taken what we call ‘the green pill’! They genuinely care about the fact that they work in a green company and make a positive difference every day.

#CleanLM gives them another reason to be proud and it is absolutely crucial to ensure they are aware of this pledge, so they are able to engage in the delivery of the program or in the communication about it to their networks.

I think it is fair to say that they are the most important stakeholders and key enablers for us as an organization to achieve the target but also the reputation benefit that comes by being a pioneer. Just imagine the impact if we manage to engage 10,000 people as green ambassadors inspiring others to follow our lead!

What did you learn during the process?
In this process we were quite concerned about the level of detail and complexity of our game would be too advanced for the limited time we had available. The audience was the top leaders in the business, so stakes were high – as would be the exposure if we failed.

We spent a LOT of energy on wording and simplifying the concept and content over several iterations until we were satisfied. It was a matter of finding that delicate balance where the audience is intrigued and challenged but not overwhelmed while maintaining some of the complexity from real life in the game.

This experience actually reflects one of the most important lessons I have learned on my 10+ years in corporate communications. When you have really invested that extra thought and care into your content and campaign you can create something with long durability and relevance which ultimately becomes a recognized franchise in the company’s communications mix.

When people start adopting and adapting it to their own communications purposes, you have really succeeded. We have done that with our first sustainability campaign featuring four mascots – The Sustainables – which were introduced five years ago but still going strong and even getting new family members from time to time. With #CleanLM we aim to create a strong internal franchise again but this time, the potential for using it externally has been considered almost equally important. We are on to something greater than ourselves and inspiring others is a huge part of measuring our success.

What is your best advice/tip to other employee communicators?
Take your audience seriously and invest the necessary time and care in learning what works with them. Do pilots, focus groups, or test runs with small samples of employees and be ready to adjust according to what you learn. Then dare to challenge and tweak to surprise and inspire! And finally, consider how you measure success already when you start designing your campaign. We all want to be able to show that our work made the intended difference.

You can read more about Lene’s activating leaders and employees in the carbon neutral agenda in her LinkedIn blog post: Watch 130 leaders go carbon neutral in 30 minutes! (LinkedIn, February 23, 2018)

‘On the Mic’ is a series of blog posts that invite internal communication professionals to share their take on employee communication, their view on trends within the field and what rocks their boat. Feel free to send us tips on who should be ‘On the Mic’ next.

This post is done in collaboration with Open – to go to the Open blog, click here.


On the Mic: Steffen Støvelbæk from Nilfisk

On the Mic: Steffen Støvelbæk from Nilfisk

Recently, Nilfisk was listed on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange – an exciting event both internally and externally. We're so glad to have Steffen Støvelbæk, Head of Communications at Nilfisk, sharing what he sees as key when communicating a stock exchange listing internally.

By: Kristina Malther, Associated Partner & Senior Communication Advisor (16 January 2018)

 

Why do you find it exciting to work with employee communication?
Because it is about people! And about interacting with people and interaction between people. Effective employee communication is really the glue that connects people with the company and the strategy. I find contributing to creating this alignment and bigger purpose and adding value for everyone a big privilege. I am responsible for both external and internal communication globally across Nilfisk. However, it becomes harder and harder to distinguish between these two disciplines, as messages of course need to be fully aligned and transparent across all channels.

What was your latest success and what made it a success?
Recently, Nilfisk was listed on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange. A listing process mainly targets investors, analysts, and other external stakeholders but we also wanted to make this an internal event. We managed to turn the listing into a successful internal celebration of a milestone in the history of Nilfisk. I think that was a great achievement and something that has left a positive mark on the company.

Why was it important to communicate the Nilfisk Stock exchange listing internally?
These types of events are not often communicated on internally because of their strong financial scope and at Nilfisk, a lot of the employees outside of Denmark didn’t really care when we communicated about the listing plans. Most of them found it irrelevant to them. We decided to use the listing as an opportunity to acknowledge the achievements of all Nilfisk employees in making this happen and to create a sense of excitement, pride, and unity around it; across all our 60+ locations worldwide. Technically, this was a demerger from Nilfisk’s former owners NKT, and we also wanted to make sure that this was seen as something positive, and not as a threat.

What did you learn during the process?
I learned that it really pays off to make an event like this a people-centered celebration, paying tribute to the employees and what they have created together – instead of only focusing on finances and investors. It is also important to get the managers onboard as early as possible in the process to support local communication activities across all sites. We used a mix of live webcasts, prerecorded videos and interviews, and Q&A’s. The unity it created across our many different locations was great.

What were your greatest communication successes in communicating internally about the listing?
We succeeded in encouraging employees across the world to use social media and share their celebrations locally. This created a nice vibe on the different SoMe platforms and a strong sense of unity internally. We really saw that aligning and bridging internal and external messages supported our employee promise and brand.

What is your best advice/tip to other employee communicators facing a Stock exchange listing?
Remember to celebrate! With the busy day-to-day grind, we often forget to celebrate and mark our achievements and successes. As human beings we all like and need that, and a listing is a great opportunity to do this. The bottom line is that the employees have all contributed to and created the company that now is financially strong enough to be listed and attract investors. That’s something to celebrate, isn’t it?

‘On the Mic’ is a series of blog posts that invite internal communication professionals to share their take on employee communication, their view on trends within the field and what rocks their boat. Feel free to send us tips on who should be ‘On the Mic’ next.

This post is done in collaboration with Open – to go to the Open blog, click here.


Road-map - Digital workplace adoption

Digital Workplace Adoption

Road-map - Digital workplace adoption

Purpose and planning are key to digital workplace adoption

The road to digital workplace adoption does not need to be a winding one. In seven steps, you can get your own, tailored roadmap to get you well on your way to successful digital workplace adoption.

By: Solrun Sigfusdottir Øfjord, Senior Communication Advisor (December 7, 2017)

 

Adoption of a new digital workplace does not happen over-night. You are probably nodding already if you have been in the epi-center of implementing such. It requires a clear purpose, well-planned communication tactics, the right competencies and tailored engagement.

Here, the Digital Workplace Adoption Roadmap Tool can come in handy. The Digital Workplace Adoption Roadmap Tool consists of seven steps that come with reflection exercises and practical advice to help drive adoption. The tool is for everyone working with employee communication, and those to embark on the journey towards a new digital workplace.

We developed the tool as part of the event ‘Roadmap to Digital Workplace Adoption’ which Open co-hosted together with BrightStarr.

You can also read live tweets from the event at #digitalworkplacedk on Twitter.

 This post is done in collaboration with Open – to go to the Open blog, click here.


Internal Communication - VR
Internal Communication - VR
Virtual reality (VR) is designed to give people extraordinary experiences, and that is exactly what we want to give employees, right? Let’s take a dive into why VR is the perfect fit for employee communication.
By: Andreas Ringsted, Creative Advisor (September 6, 2017)

 

You cannot flip through a communication site without stumbling upon at least a few articles about VR claiming: ‘VR, the next big thing’, or ‘Everything you need to know about VR’. Nonetheless, VR is still a new channel when counting how many are using it actively as a tool.

Especially when it comes to employee communication, VR is new, even though – if you ask me – everyone having employees as their target group should at least consider VR as a part of their communication mix. The major advantage of VR is giving people memorable and extraordinary experiences. And who doesn’t want to give that to their employees?

At Open, we have been working with integrating VR in employee communication. Based on our experiences, here are our thoughts on the big what, why, and how when considering VR as part of the employee communication framework.

Virtual reality

The Sensorama, the first 3D viewer from 1950

So, what is it?
First, let’s answer what VR actually is. It is about allowing your audiences to experience and interact with a virtual world by putting on VR goggles with input from a computer, or a smartphone.

VR can be either a linear or interactive story created as 360° video, or in a 3D environment. Together with stereo sound, this creates a rich, immersive and believable experience.

VR in employee communication
Besides being immersive, VR is exploratory. It gives your viewer a feeling of control. But most significantly, you have their undivided attention. This is the main argument for why VR is a perfect tool to activate and engage employees. Once donning the VR goggles, there are no bleeping phones, no nagging e-mails, and no disturbing colleagues to compete for attention. In a fast-paced work environment, this is a rare opportunity for the communicator.

This opens new opportunities in areas like onboarding, safety, and change communication. In global organizations, you can show corners of the company instead of sending employees on expensive trips. And in safety communication, you can give the audience a much better understanding, for example by letting them experience production before they set foot on the floor.

Moreover, with increased focus on the technology, VR devices have become much cheaper, and with a relatively small investment in gear, the company can push their VR videos out to the organization.

virtual reality employee communication

Hold on your hats and goggles. Just another day at the office getting everyone onboard in what VR actually is about, and what it can do.

Think big, execute small
When we first got the chance to use VR as part of an employee communication project, my storytelling sense was tingling. The narrative could not be complex enough.

However, we quickly discovered that the information delivered in a VR video needs to be even more straight to the point than in conventional video. In VR, the visual experience takes up so much of the viewer’s attention that it leaves little space for complex narration.

Also, we found out defining the why and what in detail is even more important in VR communication than in other formats. A few pointers for starting your new VR project:

Think big in the brainstorm process

  1. Involve relevant stakeholders early in the brainstorm process and give them a chance to experience VR in its various forms.
  2. Use for instance ‘How might we’ questions, known from design thinking to kick-start the innovative process and create exciting storytelling ideas.
  3. Use a mind-map to map the goal: ‘what should the viewer feel’, ‘what should they learn’, and ‘what are the primary and secondary topics’.

Execute small and precise

  1. Focus on one primary topic, and allow one or two secondary topics.
  2. Use short and precise narration.
  3. Keep the experience short, 3-4 minutes at the most.

Employee reactions say it all
Even though the implementation of VR in many digital distribution platforms, such as Valve Steam and Sony PlayStation, have made VR more common, many people have never tried it themselves. So, for many people, the experience itself will be an eye-opener.

Earlier this year, we created a VR video for a client as part of a large culture project. Project ambassadors travelled world-wide to have dialogues with employees about the project, using VR to fuel the dialogue. Besides an overwhelming positive response and incredible wow-factor, the VR video sparked curiosity, and we even experienced that people sought out more information about the project by themselves.

I truly believe VR is here to stay, simply because this kind of immersive storytelling is so powerful. Eventually virtual, augmented, and mixed reality will become an integrated part of our workspace. For now, let’s embrace VR as a new communication tool and use it to its full extent, creatively but practically.

–o0o–

Four facts about VR

  • Generation Z and Millennials are interested in trying virtual reality, but so is Baby Boomers. 64% of Baby Boomers have positive feelings about virtual reality.
  • +75% of the Forbes World’s Most Valuable Brands have created some form of virtual reality or augmented reality experience for customers or employees, or are themselves developing these technologies.
  • British travel group Thomas Cook reported a 190% increase in tours booked to New York City after offering a virtual reality experience of the city in their stores.
  • Amnesty International reported a 16% increase in direct-debit donations brought on by its VR campaign (source: youvisit.com).

 

This post is done in collaboration with Open - to go to the Open blog, click here.