corporate internal communication using virtual reality

Webinar: Virtual reality adding value in internal communication

corporate internal communication using virtual reality

Webinar: How virtual reality can add value to internal communication

And why you too should consider introducing it into your organization

New technologies are making their way into our private and work lives. Virtual reality (VR) is no longer the realm of gamers and technology geeks alone. Instead, we see more and more marketing, communication, and education employing VR and augmented reality (AR).

With this evolution of VR, we see a new, innovative and engaging communication channel emerging – but what can it do, when, and what should you use it for, and how expensive and difficult is it really? What about the ROI – is it worth it all?

In this 45-minute webinar, Michael Neidhöfer and Andreas Ringsted will discuss these themes and answer any questions you may have about VR in internal communications.

Time: Thursday 12th December 2019, 16:00 CET (GMT+1)

You can expect insights into the value VR can provide, where it is best applied, what the technology doesn’t bend to, and how to evaluate (and influence) your organization’s readiness for adopting new channels and methods – such as VR.

You can join the complimentary webinar by clicking the link below:

Webinar registration

Speakers

Michael Neidhöfer

The CEO of ZREALITY GmbH, the provider of world’s first marketing platform for XR apps and content, Michael is a serial entrepreneur who has successfully build several companies in his past, such as Netbiscuits, one of the largest mobile application platforms worldwide. Michael’s key expertise is building hyperscaling B2B SaaS/Cloud platforms and digital business models. Michael also supports several technology start-ups as a Business Angel and Advisor. He has been nominated 3 times as “Entrepreneur of the Year” in Germany.

Andreas Ringsted

The Head of Digital Experiences at Open, The Copenhagen based Internal Communications agency, Andreas has worked for +15 years creating engaging communication and experiences in external and internal communications, developing campaigns and initiatives for a long list of clients like the United Nations, the European Union, Pandora, Carlsberg, Georg Jensen, and Microsoft. Always at the forefront of technology and looking for innovative solutions, Andreas advises clients on digital solutions, across organizational levels and functions.

Facilitator

Kristina Malther

The Managing Director of Open CPT, Open’s subsidiary in South Africa, and co-founder of Open, Kristina is an expert in internal- and change communication. She has complemented her master’s degree in Communication and Psychology with training in project management, systemic leadership, MBTI/typology, coaching and facilitation. Kristina has more than 15 years’ experience as a consultant, advisor and leader.

Michael and Andreas will discuss the topic for roughly 30 minutes, with Kristina opening the arena for questions and comments both during and after.

Open is the leading internal communication agency

We combine strategic and creative communication to get everyone engaged in reaching corporate goals. We work closely with our clients to understand their needs and corporate culture, and we put their employees at the centre of everything we do.


webinar internal communication

Webinar: The strategic role of internal communication

webinar internal communication

Webinar: The strategic role of internal communication: How IC will continue to make an impact

Internal communication as a discipline has been moving from the role of a distributor of information and an engager of employees to a more strategic business function. What are the challenges in this move, and how to act on them? Mike Klein and Kasper Steensen will discuss this topic from their respective points of view in this 45-minute webinar.

You can expect insights into what the alignment gap is and how it stands in your way; where engagement, the hot topic of the past years, fits in the picture; what we mean by reducing noise; and how being human can help you gain the trust of your audience.

You can join the complimentary webinar here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1751079319179007757

Time:  Tuesday 18th June 2019, 10AM CEST (GMT+2)

Speakers

Mike Klein

One of the most visible voices and writers in the world of Internal Communication, Mike Klein is a Netherlands-based IC consultant with more than twenty years of experience. Mike has worked with major corporates including Maersk Oil, Cargill, Shell, Avery Dennison, easyJet, and Barclays, and has a strong focus on internal influence and qualitative research. An MBA graduate of London Business School, Mike is EMENA Regional Chair of the International Association of Business Communicators and principal of Changing the Terms.

Kasper Steensen

The CSO, partner and co-founder of Open, a Copenhagen based employee communications agency, Kasper has over 15 years of experience in working with internal communications, both as a field and in practice. He knows the ins and outs of the art, has advised large, global organizations such as Carlsberg, Novo Nordisk, Maersk, and Pandora, and has his finger on the pulse of what is moving in the field. He is a multi-artist when it comes to combining a strategic mindset with creative execution.

Facilitator

Kristina Malther

The Managing Director of Open CPT, Open’s subsidiary in South Africa, and co-founder of Open, Kristina is an expert in internal and change communication. She has complemented her Master’s degree in Communication and Psychology with training in project management, systemic leadership, mbti/typology, coaching and facilitation. Kristina has more than 15 years’ experience as a consultant, advisor and leader.

Mike and Kasper will discuss the topic for roughly 30 minutes, with Kristina opening the arena for questions and comments both during and after.

 

Open CPT is an internal communication agency

We develop innovative ways of communicating with employees, leaders and stakeholders to drive engagement and create sustainable change. Open CPT is a subsidiary of leading European employee communication agency, Open, and rooted in Open’s principles of creativity, involvement and simplicity. Drawing on a decade of experience from working with some of Europe’s largest corporations, we offer fresh as well as tried-and-tested approaches.


Reaching non-office colleagues; employee engagement

How do you reach non-office colleagues?

Reaching non-office colleagues; employee engagement

By Kristina Malther, Managing Director, Open CPT (April 2019).

What motivates office and non-office colleagues?

Why do people go to work? What makes them happy? Why do they stay? These are questions that we ask ourselves as internal communicators.

And we sometimes assume that there is a difference between our office and non-office colleagues.

But, we’re wrong if we think that the pay check is all that matters once you get out of the headquarter. Based on both the latest research and our experience from working with non-office workers across the globe, production workers also care whether they work for a successful company; technicians, who are always on the road, also want to feel part of a team; and the cashier in the supermarket also wants to know about the company values.

But for a lot of large organisations, reaching non-office colleagues – be that in production, frontline or mobile employees – is still a major challenge.

Infrastructure is a challenge

Reaching our colleagues outside of the office is not easy – we are often challenged by lack of infrastructure.

How do we reach the guy in the cold food production line where there are no computers or info screens? Or the nurse on the ward who is busy with patients all day? How do we manage multiple platforms, data costs and security?

Building the right infrastructure is essential and that may very well require a multi-platform approach as well as both digital and human channels.

Engaging employees

How well do you actually know your non-office colleagues?

But we are also challenged by lack of knowledge of the people who are not right next to us. We don’t really know what interests the guy in production or what channels works for him.

We presume, we simplify and we often don’t prioritise getting this insight.

Disengagement is a risk for business

And at the same time we know that we need to do something about this. We know that we are operating in a world where word of mouth, and therefore employee advocacy, is more important than ever.  And we know that crucial and sometimes elusive customer experience is mostly delivered by our non-office colleagues.

So its time to do something about it!

Engaging employees
In the 2019 Gatehouse State of The Sector survey on internal communications, 42% of internal communicators stated hard-to-reach employees as a barrier to success
5 steps on the journey to reach your non-office colleagues:

1. Start with ‘why’ – and be specific

Start by asking yourself: why do we need to reach non-office workers? Because if you don’t ask the question, someone else will – and then we need to have a good answer prepared. In many organisations, reaching non-office colleagues is still perceived as an unnecessary luxury.

Depending on your organisation and the types of non-office workers you need to reach, the ‘why’ could be about engagement and retention, or it could be part of a much bigger journey such as the digitisation of the production.

After a clear ‘why’ has been established, you can start defining your business case and return on investment.

Engaging employees

2. Remember that your non-office colleagues are not the same

They could be production workers, drivers, service technicians, sales, specialists, retail staff, etc. And the word non-office might be about the only thing some of these people have in common.

A production facility culture in China and a production facility culture in South Africa might be very different.

Differentiate and target your approach.

3. Get to know them better

  1. It seems obvious, but yet it is something that internal communicators often forget: go out and talk to people. Ask, listen and see what they do. Keep an open mind, you might be surprised.
  2. Get quantitative insights to match. Make a friend in HR/IT who can help you process available employee data.
  3. Create personas to help you bring the non-office people back into the office.

Engaging employees

4. Tailor your communication

Once you know your non-office colleagues better, you also know what is relevant to them. As a rule of thumb, we’ve found two things that work:

  • A glocal approach, with a heavier balance on local than global. Remember that what seems interesting and relevant in HQ, often is lower on the agenda further away.
  • Two-way communication; it’s not just about broadcasting, but also about establishing a line back. Ask for feedback and input and make feedback channels available.
  • And be ready to simplify when you’re reaching out to the non-connected. In this case; less is more. Go bite-sized. Go visual.

5. Build the infrastructure

These days it is often about a multi-channel approach, which could include:

  • Mobile messaging using a platform with limited data cost
  • Ensuring that your intranet is responsive for mobiles and tablets
  • Creating human networks, e.g. up-skilling team leads and supervisors to communicate and providing them with easy formats to communicate from

Start with a pilot – it’s the best way to test it out

Embarking on a project to reach all non-office colleagues in a large organisation can be daunting. Will it work? What is the cost? How do we make it operational?

That’s why starting with a pilot in a particular area of the business is often a valuable start. Here you can test approaches and channels, as well as get a better impression of what it will require in terms of day-to-day operations, cost etc.

Good luck! At the end of the day, it’s not about whether you should reach your non-office colleagues – but how and when.


Taariq Latiff

On the Mic: Taariq Latiff

Taariq Latiff

On the Mic: Taariq Latiff from Open CPT

We recently asked Taariq Latiff, BTech Product Designer and Creative Director at Open CPT, to share some insight into his life as a designer and creative in the world of internal communication.

By Aneeqah Samsodien, Communication and Brand Specialist (March 2019).

How did your career in design start?

I was commissioned to create a logo for a hair nourishing product by my first client during the third year of my studies, which then grew into brochures and packaging. I went into depression when I started my first job after studying,  designing POS units for the makeup industry. There wasn’t much room for creativity and I resigned after just three months. I vowed that I would never again work for someone or a business where I was not growing creatively. I picked up some clients, started freelancing, and gradually grew into an independent creative studio.

How did you end up at Open, specialists in internal communication?

I went for an interview at Open after a friend referred me to see what it was about. The more I heard about internal communication, the more I felt that this is the type of thing I’ve been looking for, but didn’t know existed.

What is the purpose of creating meaningful design when communicating to employees?

Design is essential when you’re communicating with employees. It’s about using a modern approach to communicate stories simply and visually across different contexts and using different materials. We are visual beings that respond to visual communication, and this should be reflected in modern-day internal communication as well.

What do you like most about working for Open?

It’s always challenging. It keeps me on my toes and I am constantly learning new techniques. The system we work within is also really great as it gives me the ability to adapt and grow. I work with really amazing designers and strategists abroad, who are specialists of their craft and always have different ways of approaching a problem. I have access to a wealth of information that wouldn’t typically be readily available due to my location.

Where would you say your specialty lies?

I love conceptualising and having a broad understanding of materials, manufacturing processes and systems, making me a good problem solver.

What are some of the first childhood memories that made you realise you had a knack for design?

From a young age, I would spend a lot of time watching my mom – a signwriter and a real perfectionist – paint signage, posters and banners. Our dining room would always be filled with poster paper and paint brushes and I’d always play with the scraps. I would find cartoon characters I really liked and would spend hours trying to redraw them until I got the correct proportions.

In primary school, I was tasked to create a show-and-tell project of what my dream job is. I used our computer and, in Microsoft Word, I designed my own chocolate bar wrappers (I’ve always loved chocolate). I even created unique names for each of the imaginary chocolate bars. That’s pretty much how my design journey started.

As a designer, name one project you have always envisioned that you would like to achieve in your lifetime. 

I’ve been blessed – I have worked on and created most of the projects I’ve conceptualised and wanted to try thus far. I’d meet a client and they’d describe the product they would want and it ends up being something I had already thought about. Most of my dream projects have been given to me and the best thing is, I got paid to do it.

If we’re talking about personal projects, I would love to design food products or create my own perfume brand.

What are some of the creative challenges you face regularly and how do you remedy them?

I love working on multiple tasks at once; that’s how I’ve been operating from a young age. At Open, using time effectively is vital to everyday life. I get a variety of tasks to manage, but there is usually one big task or project that grounds me.

Why do you do what you do, and could you see yourself doing anything else?

Frustration fuelled my desire to become a designer. When I saw poor signage, visual communication products and architecture, I noticed gaps where people weren’t paying attention to the design and how it could be improved.

If I weren’t a product designer, I would probably be an artist or a chef. I would also like to design a hydroponic garden in my backyard one day (I love plants).

On the Mic is a series of blog posts that invite internal communication professionals to share their take on employee communication, their view on trends within the field and what rocks their boat. Feel free to send us tips on who should be ‘On the Mic’ next.


values

Master Class: Bringing values to life in your organisation

values

Reputation Management master class: Bringing values to life

By: Aneeqah Samsodien, Brand and communication specialist (October 25, 2018)

“It takes years to build a reputation and only a few minutes to destroy it”, said Warren Buffett, who is viewed by many as the greatest investor of all time. On a daily basis, companies are faced with the challenge of effectively building, managing and maintaining their corporate reputation. Are you armed with the necessary skills and information to take your organisation’s reputation to the next level?

We are excited to offer a class on internal communication and values as part of Reputation Matters’ Master Class this November.

Open CPT Managing Director Kristina Malther will be hosting a Master Class on Bringing values to life, an interactive session where delegates will be taken through a process of identifying key internal areas to focus on to get messages communicated through the organisation.

The following topics will be covered on the day:

  • Core principles of communication;
  • Tendencies in internal communication;
  • Developing and implementing an internal communication strategy; step-by-step and cases
  • Why values matter;
  • How to identify and define corporate values; step-by-step and cases; and
  • How to bring values to life in the organisation; step-by-step and cases

 

This Master Class is hosted by Reputation Matters and forms part of a 5-day Master Class series endorsed by The Institute of Directors in Southern Africa (IoDSA), that will take place at the Grand West Hotel in Cape Town, South Africa.

Other speakers at the event include Regine le Roux from Reputation Matters, Cynthia Schoeman from Ethics Monitor, Jennigay Coetzer, freelance writer, author, journalist, editor and trainer, and Ashleigh Hamilton, a well-seasoned journalist.

Master Class details:

Dates: 12 – 16 November 2018

Venue: Grand West Hotel, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

Duration: 5 days; 09:00 to 16:00 daily

CPD points: 12 Points

Seats are limited to 20 people

 

Costs:

Full Master Class programme: R 21 800.00 (Inc. VAT) – Master Class of all five sessions include Regine le Roux’s book ‘Reputation Matters’, lunch and refreshments.

Individual sessions: R 4 800.00 (Inc. VAT) –  Individual sessions include lunch and refreshments

 

To register for the event, please click the link here to find out more.


Get your internal communication strategy on track

Internal Communication strategy - Open CPT

 

By: Kristina Malther, Managing Director, Open CPT (August 7, 2018)

 

We've heard it before: In the past decade, internal communication has gone from being a largely operational post office kind-of-function, to a strategic discipline, supporting the execution of business goals and employee engagement.

But oddly, many internal communicators still work without a strategy, often resulting in random priorities and a reactive behaviour. And most unfortunately, a lack of strategic line of sight between business objectives and internal communication.

Maybe it's because the task of developing an internal communication strategy seems daunting and difficult?

Maybe it's down to a lack of tradition in the field, who knows...

Why do you need an internal communication strategy?

Either way, the fact of the matter is that an internal communication strategy will help you:

  • Get buy-in - from stakeholders. With a business case, goals and KPI's you are more likely to get budgets and buy-in from your leadership.
  • Get more strategic - Duh! This seems obvious, but really, a strategy does help you become more strategic and structured in your approach - from being reactive to being proactive.
  • Demonstrate progress - once you have goals, KPI's, feedback flows and metrics in place, it's much easier to show the progress you make.
  • Delegate tasks - internal communication should not just sit at HQ - it should happen at all levels of the organisation. But without a strategy, mobilising managers and influencers is difficult.
  • Link to business strategy and goals - finally, and the most important point here; we don't do internal communication for its own sake - internal communication must support business objectives. An internal communication strategy is the way to connect the dots.
Internal communication strategy - Open CPT
Tips to help you along the way

Tips & tricks

1. Get insights
You can't develop a strategy without knowing the needs and gaps you are trying to cover. A mix of desk research, qualitative interviews, observations, and quantitative data will give you the insights you need. But don't expect yourself to necessarily do the mother of all surveys and an anthropological study first off. You should also focus on setting up ways to get ongoing data and feedback going forward. Perhaps you've already got insights in the shape of engagement surveys, user data, etc.

2. Involve stakeholders
Internal communication isn't an island. So early involvement of relevant stakeholders, eg. HR, IT, Marketing and top management is essential to not only get insights on how internal communication will create business value, but also in getting a broader ownership or internal communication going forward.

3. Use a simple framework
You don't have to reinvent the wheel and figure out a new and never-before-seen way of doing an internal communication strategy. There are templates and structures in place for what needs to be included in an internal communication strategy. Use them.

4. Don't overdo it
An internal communication strategy should be a living document - not a manifestation set in stone or your lifetime achievement. Timebox the process and rather opt for revising and reiterating once you've got it out there. After all, the point is to get out there and communicate, so you can help your organisation achieve its goals.

5. Make it travel
Too many great strategies end up in the drawer because no one wants to read those 50 slides. Make your internal communication strategy sharable by creating one-pagers and easy overviews that others can relate to. Share it at every occasion you have, share your progress and then share it again.

How to do it?

Developing an internal communication strategy doesn't have to be a gigantic project taking the best part of a year.

Over time, we have developed a simple process and approach to developing internal communication strategies - a process which is doable with a reasonable amount of resources and in three months. A fast-track process looks like this:

Good luck with your strategy!

Get in touch with Open CPT if you need help with your internal communication strategy.

 
 
 

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Employee experience roadmap tool

The Employee Experience: More than just engagement

The Employee Experience: More than just engagement

Employee Experience tool
Employee Experience Roadmap created by Open CPT

Open has designed an Employee Experience Roadmap that enables you to get started on employee experience design.

Employee experience design is top of the agenda across the world and a way to boost engagement and performance, as well as drive improvement of the customer experience. But we need more concrete learnings on what works and why.

About the Employee Experience Roadmap:

Put the spotlight on Employee Experience in your organisation and find ways to boost it!

This tool is for anyone about to embark on or continue on the journey of Employee Experience from a communication perspective.

It is a simple Roadmap that you can get started on today, to help you get an overview of what Employee Experience is all about - and where you are on this journey today.

This tool is not a detailed manual, but a quick-guide to inspire and hopefully energise you for the road ahead.

Download The Employee Experience Roadmap

Dialogue Matters - July 2018

Dialogue Matters & Open CPT

 

Dialogue Matters: Lunch Sessions

Ethics

Cape Town, Wednesday, 04 July 2018

Join Open CPT alongside Reputation Matters at our next Dialogue Matters lunch session!

 

About this session:

How do you communicate around ethics internally and externally in your organisation and personal platforms?
  • Do you and your people share a common understanding of workplace ethics?
  • Is ethics really valued in your organisation? Or are there more important success criteria?
  • How well do you manage ethics? Well enough to minimise risk and reputational damage?
  • Where does your organisation's culture lie on the ethical - toxic culture continuum?
At the session, you will gain insight into:
  • The importance of research and the role that ethics plays in Africa
  • Insights into top ethics trends and the Ethics Monitor Toolkit
  • The importance of values - and how to bring them to life in your organisation

 

   Wednesday, July 04, 2018

 

   13:00 to 15:00

 

         The Attic Function room, The Woodstock Exchange, 4th Floor, Cape Town

 

 Tickets cost R 100.00 per person. Seats are limited to 15.

 

  RSVP by Wednesday, 27 June, 2018.

 

 

The Programme:

  • Welcoming and coffee;
  • Reputation and Ethics in Africa:
  • Ethics trends and Ethics Monitor Toolkit:
  • Importance of values - how to define and communicate values in your organisation.
  • Networking

 

If you are interested in attending this lunch session, please send a mail of confirmation of interest to [email protected] and we will get back to you. Please note that seating is very limited.

 

The Dialogue Matters breakfast sessions are run in collaboration by Regine le Roux (Managing Director of Reputation Matters), Lisa Wannell (Founder and Director of  Halogen Search & Select) and Kristina Malther (Managing Director of Open Cape Town).

 

We will for the first time at Dialogue Matters, be hosting guest speaker Cynthia Schoeman, Founder and MD of Ethics Monitor.

 

About Dialogue Matters Sessions:

The Dialogue Matters sessions offer insights, case studies and networking around the latest topics on the agenda in the field of corporate communications and reputation management. These sessions are brought to you by Reputation Matters and Open CPT.


Employee Experience Panel CPT

Employee Experience Panel - an exclusive network

Employee Experience Panel

Employee Experience Panel - an exclusive network

We're growing our network in Africa and invite professionals in the field of communications, HR and branding who work with, or are about to embark on, Employee Experience design to join our Employee Experience Panel.

Employee Experience is fast hitting the agenda as a way to link customer experience design, brand advocacy and employee engagement - but most organisations are just at the early stages and need to find ways to go about it.

The Employee Experience panel will be a curated network for exchanging insights and challenges on the topic - facilitated by Open CPT and in parallel with a similar panel in Copenhagen.

 

Open CPT Employee Experience Panel

The network is by invitation only. If you are interested in joining and think you fit the profile, get in touch or follow this link to let us know your interests and needs: https://bit.ly/2xYtyrW

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